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Sep 7, 2014 / 113 notes

historysisco:

On this day in history September 7, 1822: On the banks of the Ipiranga River in São Paulo, Crown Prince Regent Pedro declared Brazil’s independence from Portugal.

The article Brazil’s Independence Day - September 7: Independência ou Morte by Bonnie Hamre from the Go SouthAmerica About webpage briefly describes some of the events that led to Brazil’s Declaration of Independence by Prince Regent Pedro:

With Napoleon and the Peninsular Wars, and the invasion and occupation of Spain and Portugal, Dom João VI, the seventeenth king of Portugal, fled Lisbon and established his court in Rio de Janeiro, where for the next 13 years, he ruled Portugal’s Asian, African, and American colonies. Although Dom João VI (1769-1826) never ruled over an independent Brazil, historians call him the “Founder of the Brazilian Nationality.” One of his major contributions to the growth of Brazil was opening the colony’s ports to free trade with friendly nations, thus signaling a marked change in trade and the resulting improved consequence of Brazil. Additionally, Dom João VI spearheaded the founding of the Academia Naval (Naval Academy), Hospital Militar (Military Hospital), Arquivo Militar (Military Archives), Jardim Botânico (Botanic Garden), Intendência Geral de Polícia (Police Commissariat), Real Biblioteca (Royal Library), the Banco do Brasil (Bank of Brazil), and the gunpowder factory. With the defeat of Napoleon in 1815, he thought it safe to make Brazil another kingdom equal to Portugal. He also decided to remain in Brazil.

The Portuguese government disagreed with both decisions and in 1820 sent troops to assist his relocation to Portugal where the army headed a revolution designed to bring about a constitutional government with Dom João as the constitutional monarch. Dom João returned to Portugal, leaving his 23-year-old son Pedro as prince regent of Brazil. Pedro actively engaged in enlisting support from both able advisors and the people of Brazil.

With revolutions and the desire for independence active in other Latin American countries, Pedro realized Brazil would soon wish for the same. With the support of the Brazilian people and the Brazilian Senate who had bestowed on him the title of Defensor e Protetor Perpétuo do Brasil, Protector and Perpetual Defender of Brazil, he defied an order to return to Portugal. When the Portuguese parliament wished to return Brazil to colonial status, Pedro seized the moment. On September 7, 1822, after receiving orders from the Portuguese parliament limiting his powers in Brazil, Pedro declared Brazil’s independence near the Ipiranga River in São Paulo. Tearing the Portuguese blue and white insignia from his uniform, Pedro drew his sword, and swore: “By my blood, by my honor, and by God: I will make Brazil free.” Their motto, he said, would be Independência ou Morte, Independence or Death! This statement is known as the Grito do Ipiranga.

Pedro de Alcântara Francisco Antônio João Carlos Xavier de Paula Miguel Rafael Joaquim José Gonzaga Pascoal Cipriano Serafim de Bragança e Bourbom, became Dom Pedro I, the first emperor of Brazil and ruled for nine years.

Brazil’s independence was officially Britain and Portugal via the Treaty of Rio de Janeiro on August 29, 1825.

For Further Reading:

(via thisisnotlatinx)

Jun 9, 2014 / 178 notes

lucreza:

history meme | three inventions ∙ alberto santos dumont’s 14-bis 

In October 23, 1906 the Brazilian Alberto Santos Dumont made the first mechanical flight on a heavier-than-air machine: at 4 p.m. his airplane, the “14-bis”, rose from the ground and traveled the distance of 60 meters at a height of 2 to 3 meters: a small flight for a man but a great flight for humanity!

On November 12, he set the first aviation record in the world, flying 220 meters in 21 ½ seconds with members of the Aero-Club du France in attendance. This won Santos Dumont a prize of 1500 francs for making the first flight over 100 meters. The flight was observed by officials from what would become the Federation Aeronautique Internationale (the designated keeper of aviation records), and was credited the first mechanical flight in the world.

When Santos Dumont decided to attack the problem of the mechanical flight, this conception was considered utopian by his contemporaries, and remained so until 1905. After Dumont’s flight, nobody doubted more of the possibility of the mechanical flight. French Captain Ferber in his book “Aviation” written in 1907, says: “The Brazilian inventor has proved that flying machines can fly,” which is equivalent to saying that until then nobody else had. [x]

bruuniix:

Ipanema píer local 
Mar 2, 2014 / 120 notes

bruuniix:

Ipanema píer local 

oldsaopaulo:

Sao Joao Avenue in the early 50’s
Sao Paulo - Brazil
Mar 2, 2014 / 195 notes

oldsaopaulo:

Sao Joao Avenue in the early 50’s

Sao Paulo - Brazil

Roosvelt and Getúlio Vargas
Mar 2, 2014

Roosvelt and Getúlio Vargas

imagesofwar:

Constitutionalist Revolution of 1932 (Revolução Constitucionalista de 1932)
Feb 27, 2014 / 18 notes

imagesofwar:

Constitutionalist Revolution of 1932 (Revolução Constitucionalista de 1932)

oldsaopaulo:

Taxi driver and police officer at Sao Joao Avenue.
Sao Paulo - Brazil
Nov 16, 2013 / 20 notes

oldsaopaulo:

Taxi driver and police officer at Sao Joao Avenue.

Sao Paulo - Brazil

architectureofdoom:

pasamontanias:

roberto burle marx

Parque Brigadeiro Eduardo Gomes, Rio de Janeiro
Nov 16, 2013 / 501 notes

architectureofdoom:

pasamontanias:

roberto burle marx

Parque Brigadeiro Eduardo Gomes, Rio de Janeiro

Student movement against the military government (1960’s)
[Arquivo Público do Estado de São Paulo]
Nov 16, 2013 / 1 note

Student movement against the military government (1960’s)

[Arquivo Público do Estado de São Paulo]

by Kurt Klagsbrunn
Copacabana, Rio de Janeiro (1946)
Nov 10, 2013 / 4 notes

by Kurt Klagsbrunn

Copacabana, Rio de Janeiro (1946)